Public domain image, courtesy of Wikipedia.

Public domain image, courtesy of Wikipedia.

Is it time for Celtic Swirls of Love to Replace Straight Roman Lines in Our Infrastructures?

In Copulating Cats and Holy Men: the Story of the Creation of the Book of Kells UK author Simon Worrall sees parallels to our times. He approaches “the most richly ornamented book ever created by man’s hand” as a riddle full of a series of visible clues.

It is a “holy comic strip,” a “beguiling Noah’s Ark of animals and birds that kick and flap and stamp, like the blue wolf that pads along a path of Latin script; or the moths that flit behind a curtain of braided ornamentation,” Worrall says. The monks saw in the cat an analogy to godhead.

Google’s doodle page used a Kells detail as a welcoming image for St. Patrick’s Day. Computer scientists and art historians digitalizing its pages for popular applications have posted their  video on YouTube.

By 791, A.D., Western civilization had been brought to the brink of destruction by barbarians and Vikings. Everything must be coded into a visual data bank and saved. One genius Irish artist had his fingertips on the entire repertoire of Celtic art and metal work. Another, a southerner, knew the art of the ancient Mediterranean world. Nine artists worked together.

It celebrates the facial expressions of love instead of power and preserves the continuity of European culture. After centuries of victimization, abuse, burial, romanticization, neglect and oblivion until it was miraculously stored at Trinity College, University of Dublin, the relic is being cast in a new role.

Worrall sums up, “The Greco-Roman world order and all that it brought us — straight roads, the subjugation of nature and other civilizations to our material will; cultural narcissism — is faltering. The new house of Europe, open from Manchester to Moscow, is the Celtic geography restored.”

Is the oldest, most tenacious of European cultures your  “in” look  too?

This blog post adds to the mystery of why anyone would entitle their family memoir A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void. (Our surname was Kell and I grew up as a preacher’s kid. There’s some doubt over whether or not our family originated in a community of ninth century monks).

http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany  http://www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com

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