Archives for category: Awareness Alert

waltwashpost

http://www.observer-reporter.com/20170127/peters_student_honored_for_lifesaving_cpr_on_friend

Heroes don’t exist everywhere, everyday but they can spring up anywhere, anytime. One of them could even be  you. Eighteen hundred grade-ten students learned this lesson last week at a joyous assembly in a Pittsburgh school auditorium. Two of their classmates, 15-year-old Parker and Walter, had played real-life roles of  survivor and hero in a fateful disastrous instant in October.

The Fateful Event

  • The two best friends were sitting side by side on a bleacher in the local skate park on a Saturday morning. Suddenly Parker turned to Walter and said, “My heart stopped.” When he dropped his phone and collapsed onto the concrete below Walter knew he wasn’t joking.
  • He screamed his head off for help from bystanders and a call was made to 911. Walter told the dispatcher Parker’s nose and lips were blue and the dispatcher said he needed CPR right away. Walter said, “I can do that. I learned it in health class last year.”
  • For 10 minutes he gave Parker CPR and kept talking to him until the police and emergency workers arrived and took over. With Parker on a stretcher and Walter in a panic, the ambulance carried them off.
  • En route Walter phoned his father who rushed to join him at the hospital. Parker was induced into a coma and airlifted to a trauma center. Walter wanted to go with his friend but a nurse convinced him he had done all he could. His father dropped him off at his mother’s to find consolation.
  • With the help of surgery to attach an AED (automated electronic defibrillator), and rest, Parker recovered and was back at school within weeks. His heart is strong; the cause of his cardiac arrest is unknown. He looks forward to resuming playing soccer.

The Commendation

  • Emergency workers and police at the scene and doctors and nurses at the hospital showered praise on Walter for his presence of mind under pressure and trying circumstances.
  • Teacher John Valvala who had taught him CPR was “thrilled” by what Walter had done, thanked and congratulated him.
  • The chief of the Allegheny County Police department saw this as a chance to show heart and strengthen community. It could be used to inspire other teenagers to play the important bystander role which is as vital as any other to a patient’s survival.
  • He announced in January that Walter would receive a Citizen Service Award. The commendation ceremony would be at the school in co-operation with everyone else who had been involved.
  • This event would attract the attention of the community through the media. It was a rare opportunity to put the police in a good light, pointing out what people do that is right, not just what they do that is wrong.
  • The St. Clair hospital announced it would give Walter a Health Hero Award at the same ceremony.

The Heroic Drama & Inspiration

  • It was an exceedingly happy, inspiring occasion. A roar of thunderous applause and cheers went up from the student body and family members as police and doctors presented the awards and shoulder patches.
  • Parker and Walter modestly thanked everyone else, from friends to GoFund donors, in their speeches.
  • Audience happiness got noisier with each inspiring speech aimed at them. It was deafening when the three personal wellness (health) teachers were called up on stage.
  • Police superintendent Coleman McDonough said Walter’s extraordinary act “changed his life forever and changed all of us. One person who is here wouldn’t be.”
  • “It is important for all of you to see one of your peers being honored. It was a service rendered to the citizens of the county. His actions are a credit to himself and all citizens,” McDonough said.
  • Surgeon Kevin Friend said he had been inspired to go into medicine after a classmate saved his life by applying the Heimlich maneuver. He choked on a hot dog he was eating while exerting himself as the anchor man in a school tug of war contest. Ironically, up until then he didn’t like the boy who saved  him  — they had a crush on the same girl.
  • Assistant principal Lesnett got the last round of applause as he challenged the students to  “Be alert. A moment can make a difference. You can make a difference. Don’t just let things happen.”

Follow-up for Walter

  • I had a front seat at this milestone event for our family. We have been fractured by divorce proceedings for four years. This proud happy occasion brought both sides together unexpectedly.
  • Stepbrother Derek joked with brother Robert (both older than Walter), “You and I are just ‘the other brothers’ now”.
  • Father Leslie said, “I think I deserve a little bit of the credit here. I always told my boys to listen to what their teachers said.”
  • Two years ago Walter started an entertaining YouTube channel of videos about “whatever interests me.” It has a growing following among his peers. His ambition is to become an actor or film director. He is a good enough student to take any direction he chooses.  But, most of all, he wants to  make people laugh.
  • Thank you, Walter. You have succeeded.

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Murder Reminders on Main Street. Aylmer Bulletin Photo.

‘Murdered,’ ‘Missing’ or ‘Abused’ Reminders along Main St. in Aylmer, QC. Le Bulletin Photo

Last week the residents of Aylmer were treated to a flashy display of 40 red dresses flapping from the lamp posts lining Main Street. Or was it such a treat? The dresses were hung up to honor attractive, lively young spirits who filled them in happier times. A recent RCMP report shows that 1,181 Canadian aboriginal women were victims of homicide between 1980 and 2012. Currently 225 cases of missing or murdered aboriginal women are unsolved.

The used red dresses were tossed into a box at the Aylmer Bulletin after a local charity sent out an appeal. The exposition moved on to Parliament Hill and will go on to other locations to raise awareness.

The novella, Nirmala the Mud Blossom by Fiza Pathan, and the prehistoric novel, Eyo, the People, by Donella Dunlop, both record facts of the tragic treatment of women and girls. The first is set in today’s slums of  Mumbai, India; the second is about the first people who crossed the Bering Strait land bridge into North America in 12,000 B.C.

If more of us even do a little something about it, like reading a report, a book or donating a dress, it will be faced up to more, brought out into the open and reduced. That will make life a lot safer for attractive, lively women and young girls we all like to see in red dresses.

See Patricia Cassidy’s photographs of the dresses on Main Street 

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