Archives for category: Family

 Here’s an event to stimulate finding about your old roots in the British Isles.
“Walk in for online registration to join in the 23rd Annual British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa’s Family History Conference. It starts at 5 p.m. on Sept. 29 at Ben Franklin Place in Ottawa and runs until Sunday, Sept. 31 at 3:30 p.m. Simply drop by 501 Centrepointe Drive, Nepean, Ottawa to register and pay.
The  conference brochure describes program details and rates and says, “Come for one or two seminars, one day, two days – or all three days.
“Learn about English and Welsh family history and genealogy research methodology. Read about our speakers, seminars, lectures, and activities.
Browse, shop, and chat with vendors in our Marketplace that is open to the public with no admission fee.”
I’m proud to take part as a vendor and will be launching a new editing service especially for writers of family history manuscripts who have submitted them to traditional publishers but been rejected.

BIFHSGO is a wonderful network with over 600 members from all over. I’m looking forward to chatting with many congenial people and hope to see you among them. I’ll be there from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday.
http://www.margaretvirany.com  www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

Advertisements
orieloucks.jpg.fcaf306d

Loucks’ heart was amongst the trees. Minden (ON) Times photo and cutline.

With scientific precision, superb literacy, brilliant intellect, fatherly tact and noble modesty, Dr. Orie Loucks http://www.mindentimes.ca/remembering-orie-loucks begins his family’s story by advising us how to approach the awesome task. Loucks was an esteemed scientist, author and conservationist.

1. Family history must be more than births, marriages and deaths. It needs to tell who the people are and why they came to the places where we find them.
2. We should learn what concerns drove them from one home place to another, in poverty or wealth.
3. We should also try to learn what are the values and interests of the family line that continue from one generation to the next. We may find family values that are evident over four or five hundred years.
4. One must wonder whether character traits, and not just physical resemblance, may have been carried along. Did the qualities that led to stubborn persistence on early Huguenot faith traditions continue until certain family leaders supported the British in the American Revolutionary war, and does it still continue today?
5. Great changes in circumstances faced by nearly every generation should be seen as a critical influence on each family’s life. Through all the change, we can expect to see continuity of family character.

6. This report tries to highlight both the ups and downs of each generation’s prospects. The record suggests the family aspired to be fair and just and try to make the world a better place in the future. Each one adapted and then practiced what they learned or believed in from the former generations.
7. Relevant history was passed down in 2010 at the 300th reunion of Laux/Loucks family members of the 1710 Palatine refugee migration. It not only added depth to the historical record, but also family relationships across generations were sustained, along with evidence of the continuity of physical appearance. Many participants at the reunion were struck by the resemblance that continues in males of the family, the square face, the strong though not prominent nose, and the firm but often dimpled chin.

8. Looking for the source of the surname revealed it spanned languages such as Spanish, French, Latin and Occitan, according to David Loux, author of part I, chapter 2 of the book. Different spellings in English are all pronounced the same way.
9. Other sources he consulted were the French armorial coat-of arms; dictionaries to give meanings of the name, maps to show localities, mountain ranges and lakes named du Laux, du Loux, Lau or Loucks. Pronunciation research was done into Occitan (they spoke this patois every day but used Latin for business and diplomacy.)
10. Finding out the influence of historical context on this family’s fortunes was crucial. The major social upheavals that impacted them, for better or worse, were the Crusades starting in 1096, the Albigensian ‘Crusade’ (persecution) two centuries later, and the religious wars that mobilized French society from the 10th to 17th centuries. France had no separation of church and state and Roman Catholicism was the state-sponsored religion. French reformers
(Huguenots) were driven into a major exodus.

“As minor nobility, some du Laux families would have held Huguenot church services in their homes. They would have fought alongside other families in defense of their religious cause and, as identifiable nobility, their homes would have been at risk for being ravaged and burned. The du Laux name turned up in Wiesbaden, Germany and from there they migrated to the United States.”

To find out more about Surviving 4 Migrations: The Loucks of Haliburton or to purchase a copy, please click on http://www.lulu.com/ca/en/shop/orie-loucks/surviving-four-migrations-the-loucks-of-haliburton/paperback/product-20163703.html

It is described as “A history of the Loucks family: France to Germany, to New York State, and Ontario from the 1620’s to the present.” pp. 280

http://www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com http://www.margaretvirany.com http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

Prospects for selling my book at the Byward Market in Ottawa when I arrived at 10 a.m. Wednesday looked as dim as the thunderstorm forecast. Still, I bet myself I could sell enough copies (five) in the next six hours to buy tickets for a big treat. I defied the skies to clear in time for a picnic with our granddaughters and their parents before watching the preview performance of theater under the stars on the banks of the Rideau River that night. mmarket.jpgWork crews carrying partitions, shopkeepers rushing with arms full to set up for the day, twosomes and threesomes speaking languages other than English brushed past. Where were my buyers?

  • The atmosphere enlivened at lunch time, with music and dancing in the adjacent square attracting a noisy, lively crowd. A quarrel between someone not quite in his right senses and a big truck disrupted the self improvement, creative atmosphere I was trying to inject.
  • A dreary-eyed, homeless man with his bundles and bags slouched up against the bricks, heritage plaque and sesquicentennial posters on the market building facing me. Where were my readers?

It was discouraging and my devoted hubby of 61 years decided I was crazy and he might as well abandon ship and go home.  While he hesitated, I was ready with my elevator pitch to summarize my book in two sentences.

  • Anyone drawn to the table for a closer look at my framed newspaper article headlined “Call of Love in the Wilderness” got it. An old toothless man mesmerized by a 1904 picture of my mother as a child in a sailor outfit stayed because he wanted to hear her full story.
  • With a cheery “Hi Margaret!” up strode author Stevie Szabad, eager to buy two of my books and pick up advice from someone she perceived as having accomplished things she wanted to do. We plotted to sell together at the Galeries Aylmer Christmas market. 

Hubby stayed when I reminded him I was there to get my parents’ exemplary story out, not just sell the product. A take-out lunch of chicken sandwiches and smoothies fortified us both. 

  • Then a ray of sunshine, a tourist from Vancouver, suddenly appeared. He wanted to know more about why I called my book “A Book of Kells” and gave me advice on genealogy. He bought a signed copy as a gift and souvenir of Canada’s 150th.
  • A particularly friendly face came to the table confidently and I was able to engage her in conversation. For the next twenty minutes Tom and I found we had much to share with her and vice versa. Gale O’Brien is a lovely, avid reader who lives in Britannia by the Ottawa river. She now owns one copy of A Book of Kells and one of  Kathleen’s Cariole Ride which I hope she will enjoy reading.
  • When Kelly Buell turned up because she had been following me online, Tom was getting the car because it was 4 p.m., time for us to pack up. Kelly and I chatted and hope to help each other in future as writers so often do.

When I first met the organizer of the Byward marketing team and showed her my book, she told me she is a ‘Kell’ on her mother’s side. I was able to inform lovely, competent Megan Sartori that we are second cousins twice removed. 

By the way, the outdoor performance in Strathcona Park was superb. My granddaughters, aged 10 to 16 were absolutely thrilled with The Amorous Servant by Carl Goldoni staged by Odyssey theater. Grandpa and Grandma enjoyed its humor and sensible advice for all ages, too.

www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com  www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany  www.margaretvirany.com

Happy Reading & Writing from Cozy Book Basics until We Meet Again!

IMG_0765To the tune of oxymoronic incongruous\appropriate music, 300 fresh-faced, happy teen-agers in red and white caps and gowns commenced real life Saturday in Pennsyvlania’s Peters Township. The high school band did not give up on churning out Land of Hope & Glory until it lauded every last grad into a seat on the football turf prior to being called to cross the stage to get a handshake and diploma.

Few realized the mind-blowing march music also has words. The setting of majestic trees, and sunshine that emerged late in a thunderous day thrilled us grandparents. We were among thousands of proud family members invited to honor the young ones’ achievements. People on the public bleachers looked on from the other side of the stage.

“Why does Britain Use Our Graduation Song As a National Anthem?” http://www.anglotopia.net/anglophilia/lost-in-the-pond-how-americas-graduation-march-was-actually-a-product-of-england/

1. Land of Hope & Glory was composed by Englishman Sir Edward Elgar in 1901 as part of a series of marches called Pomp & Circumstance. When Queen Victoria died and her son, King Edward VII, acceded to the throne, Elgar was asked to compose appropriate music. The new king liked the section of Pomp & Circumstance we now know as Land of Hope & Glory so A.C. Benson composed words to it.

2. Benson’s words to the favorite stanza which is replayed incessantly are:

Land of hope and glory, mother of the free

How shall we extol thee, who art born of thee?

Wider still and wider shall thy bounds be set

God who made thee mighty, make thee mightier yet.

God who made thee mighty, make thee mightier yet.

3. It became a very popular patriotic song which Elgar called the “music of a lifetime.” It bragged about England’s three centuries of worldwide imperial conquests. While he was still alive, the lyrics helped Britain win world war one.

4. In the 1920’s Elgar was awarded an honorary degree by Harvard University. At the end of the ceremony, Land of Hope & Glory was played as a recessional. The crowd liked it so much they have played it every year since. Other universities all across the United States followed suit. More and more are playing it until this day. Now it has reached down even to elementary school and kindergarten levels.

5.Vera Lynn’s recording of it stirred British courage as they went on to win world war two. Meanwhile, it was picked up to be played when British athletes won medals at the Olympics. Several football teams in the UK rewrote the words to make it ‘their’ song. It was almost chosen as the British national anthem instead of God Save the King.

6. The BBC philharmonic orchestra in London plays Land of Hope & Glory on its ‘Last Night at the Proms’ every summer. The audience rises to sing the words, waving their union jack flags in an electrifying display of patriotism.

Wild Roots Worth Honoring in America’s Future

Reference: https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-06-17/wild-english-roots-song-youll-hear-every-graduation-summer

1. Nothing is more powerful than being imbued with patriotic emotions in one’s childhood. My mother took me to England when I was four and when I reheard Land of Hope & Glory now, at age 84, I imagined I saw the Buckingham Palace guards marching as the words went round and round in my head. I did not feel vicious, just thrilled, strong and ready to face the music of life, so to speak.

2. Other writers on this subject point out the empowering, stirring music (see links above) casts off and loses its outdated messages of racism and expansionism “in the pond” on the way to America.

3. We forgive our parents’ mistakes and are one big happy family, appreciating our inherited influences and parents’ love and guidance as we set out in our own direction.

4. This was a good message for the grads to absorb on their hopeful, glorious night. Now they commence living in a world made more secure by their maturing emotions and thoughts.

May they be blessed and find wide and mighty opportunities for fulfillment, success and happiness!

Jack would be a long, lonely journey for Jack from the white cliffs of Dover back to the Indian reserve in Oxford House, MB

Canadian sailor Jack had come courting, was rejected and felt banished. It would be a long, lonely journey back to the mission field in Oxford House, Manitoba. But he was stubborn. As he looked toward the sea from atop  the white cliffs of Dover, he couldn’t bring himself to give up all hope.

Kathleen felt as miserable as the weather, but a nagging voice inside told her it would be too risky to marry a Canadian.

Kathleen felt as miserable as the weather. A voice inside told her it would be impossible for her to marry this Canadian; it was far too risky. So, she had to just let him slip away.

  • You can now read in paperback form the compelling story of what happened to Jack and Kathleen. It is a true love story from over the ocean and in the bush after World War 1.
  • To order a copy of Kathleen’s Cariole Ride  for Christmas giving, or to find out about e-book and paperback versions of A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void and Eating at Church, click on the link to Amazoor my website.
  • You might just love coming out to see Old Aylmer. Ottawa’s most bilingual suburb on the Quebec side is always festive, with its replica of the old Symmes Inn at the bend in the river where Champlain rested and its British Hotel to which where D’Arcy McGee’s murderers fled.
  • The Art & Artisans’ Sale at the Galeries d’Aylmer takes place on Nov. 25 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stevie Szabad, ‘army brat’ and I, ‘preacher’s kid’ promise not to fight or pray while we chat and offer to sell and sign at our book table. We hope you’ll consider our memoirs a real ‘find’ to put in your Christmas shopping basket — something enjoyably cozy now and possibly forever.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics

http://www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com. http://www.margaretvirany.com

the queen

I don’t know about you but I think lots of little things that boost ordinary people add up to important reasons for retaining the monarch. To the Queen! She’s a symbol of steadfastness & civility. (Full disclosure: I’m a war bride’s child named after a Princess.)

http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

http://www.margaretvirany.com

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

ServietteThis St. Patrick’s paper napkin from a package my mother bought in 1942 started me on a collection which is a very satisfying hobby.

As a child:

  • In the northern Ontario town of Cochrane (pop. 3,000) I was the preacher’s kid who collected paper napkins (called serviettes in Canada.)
  • My mother’s friends and the neighbors on our street saw me coming and invited me in for a cookie while they rummaged through their sideboards (buffets) to see what they could find.
  • My father, when he traveled out-of-town, did not have to worry or spend money on a token to bring home. He just had to stuff his napkin in his pocket to thrill this little girl.
  •  Solitary hours spent counting, categorizing, analyzing, distinguishing and admiring the many geometric patterns and drawings of nature, weddings and  seasonal celebrations brought me joy.
  • My world vision expanded: Japanese napkins were made of rice paper; transparent layers of luminous, floating, pastel floral designs clung together to make them absorbent. British serviettes, if they had them, were stiff and hand painted. The United States had drive-in restaurants.
  • Signs of the times resonated, with British flags and Churchillian bulldogs to support the war effort.
  • Gossipy secrets spilled out: I never would have suspected that Mr. and Mrs. X played golf, went to girly bars and drank cocktails when they were in Florida, far away from wintry Cochrane and my father’s sermons.

As an author, mother and grandmother

  • My collection of paper napkins helped me recall the emotions and events of my youth when I wrote our family’s memoir
  • Writing names and dates of occasions such as “my high school graduation party, 1950” on the back destroyed the beauty of the serviette but preserved and stimulated more priceless memories
  • An easel with a collage of vintage wedding and floral paper napkins under plastic was mounted in our garden for our daughter’s wedding reception and admired by the guests
  • The 500 napkins still are in good shape, in spite of much handling. A selection was exhibited at the local library at Thanksgiving time.
  • As a living, growing hobby, I hope it passes along to someone with the receptive genes.

Find out more about A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void,  Kathleen’s Cariole Ride and Eating at Church on Amazon,  Goodreads or my website.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

Share this:

A tiny 2-inch pop-up Valentine, circa 1920

A tiny 2-inch pop-up Valentine, circa 1920 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Come along with Kathleen as a Valentine’s treat

Because her story is so sweet.

Kathleen was a British high school girl in 1917 when her father brought a Canadian sailor home for tea. How they fell in love, married and lived with the Cree people in the north is the subject of Kathleen’s Cariole Ride: A True Love Story from over the Ocean and in the Bush after WWI. Their daughter’s loving book lets you experience their joys by reading their own letters. The highlight of their adventures was a five-day winter trek to find a place for their first baby to born.

Final Proof of a paperback edited with phone help from Createspace

Final Proof of a paperback edited with phone help from Createspace

The book makes a heartwarming, non-fattening, long-lasting gift for Valentiine’s Day. It is available in either e-book or paperback format on Amazon.

Thank you for spending some of your valuable time as my guest on cozybookbasics. I hope you like it here, write a comment and browse around by clicking above on ‘Home.’ My writing, whether blog or book, is always personal, fast-paced and focused on the outer and inner adventures of real people, going back beyond three generations. You can familiarize yourself with my books at this Amazon link to A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void,  Kathleen’s Cariole Ride and Eating at Church. Join me on Goodreads or my personal author page also.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

Enhanced by Zemanta

photoWhen you take a colour photograph from your kitchen at 10 a.m and it looks like this, you are transformed. The bird bath and sun dial have been foreclosed by elves and fairies. The front lawn’s curb appeal has gone up by 100 percent. And for five months you can stop worrying about weeds and insect bites. How peaceful is that!

Margaret Kell Virany, lover of language and literature, note-taker of Northrop Frye, journalist, editor, author  www.cozybookbasics.com  www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany 

orchf-25The obit read “Bob, the husband and best friend of Wendy, died at home on Oct. 23rd in his 80th year. They had celebrated their 51st wedding anniversary on Dec. 23rd with eggnog and Good King Wenceslas . . . ”

When his heart stopped at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday, and the fear of having to return to hospital to amputate his diabetes-stricken legs ended, Wendy’s love did not skip a beat. She called her son and daughter’s families to come and they asked her to “make it like Christmas or a birthday for the kids.”

So the beautiful, red-haired grandchildren slept beside her that night on the livingroom floor while she stayed awake by the coffin and they were not frightened. Wendy saw Bob’s face was still radiant; she put a copy of the book he had edited in his hands and Russell, the eldest, gave “Grumps” a chocolate bar.

On the third day, friends and family came to murmur and munch and mourn, while the closed coffin peeked from behind delicate, exuberant orchids and lilies. Next morning the gloomy sky provided the tears as the Saint James the Less funeral chapel filled up with people.

The eulogists painted a heartfelt portrait of a brilliant, shy, complex, compassionate man. After listening, the minister said First Corinthians 13 came to mind. A ripple of laughter rustled the pews when Bob’s daughter Shelley quoted an article in CA Magazine that said, “What Bob can do to a shirt and tie over lunch is legendary.” They had had to send one to the cleaners to dress the corpse. The minister said that was a waste, since Jesus had gone ahead to prepare a banquet.

Not a spook was in sight in the graveyard as we left Bob’s body in the chapel and went to Wendy’s home for lunch.

**************************************

From the Toronto Globe and Mail

Robert Douglas Brown
Born August 3, 1934 in Stratford, Ontario
Died October 23, 2013 in Toronto

Bob, Wendy’s husband and best friend, passed away at home on October 23, 2013, in his 80th year. Together since 1961, Bob and Wendy celebrated their 51st wedding anniversary last December over eggnog and Good King Wenceslas. We all loved Bob. For his tremendous intellect, insatiable curiosity and that mischievous sense of humour. His son Rob and wife Sookie (nee Allen); daughter Michelle (never called Shelley) and husband Chris Farano will all miss Bob’s loving guidance. Who will we go to now that we can’t, ‘go ask Dad’? He was dubbed ”Grumps” by his grandchildren Russell, Theo (aka Charlie), Tilly, Sarah and Ellie. They knew and loved his booming voice and conspiratorial grin. To them, he was the Stony Lake Shark. Growing up in Stratford, Bob and his sister Bev (who died in 1999, leaving her husband Clark Shaw of Lake Hughes, Quebec) shared a love of reading – although they both began all books on the last page. Why read a book if you don’t like how it ends? Indeed. ”Bob’s your uncle” isn’t something that applies to just anyone, but it was true for Karen, Kevin, Kyle and Kelly Shaw and Mary-Elizabeth Protter (nee Day). Bob taught himself to read before he went to kindergarten and graduated from Parkdale Collegiate at the top of his class. Scholarships took him to the University of Toronto for his B. Comm and the University of Chicago for his Masters in Economics. Bob joined PriceWaterhouse in 1957, when he couldn’t tell one accounting firm from another. He earned his CA designation in 1960, became the firm’s youngest partner at the time in 1966, and went on to become Chairman of the Canadian firm and Member of the World Board in 1990. Bob claimed that he retired in 1996, but we were never quite sure what he meant by retirement. He became Chair of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants in 1996, then became Chair of the CD Howe Institute in 1997, and had to cut that short when he started commuting to Ottawa as the Clifford Clark Visiting Economist to the Department of Finance from 1998 to 2001. Throughout his adult life, Bob tirelessly and passionately committed his time and energy to the shaping of tax and government spending policy in Canada, serving as Chair of the Canadian Tax Foundation and on various Parliamentary Committees, and writing and speaking prolifically. Bob enthusiastically served on many corporate and charitable boards and with many industry associations. Bob and Wendy met over a bridge game on a blind date in 1961 at Marg and Tom Virany’s; they played their last game together with dear friends Don Stevenson and Carol Galimberti on Sunday. Bob and Don, partners that day as so many times before, won hands down. Bob is resting at home; friends and family are invited to visit Friday from 4 to 8 p.m. at 164 St. Leonards Ave. The funeral service will be on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at St. James-the-Less Chapel (635 Parliament St., just south of Bloor). Donations to the Stony Lake Heritage Foundation or the Royal Ontario Museum would be gratefully appreciated by the whole family.

Margaret Kell Virany is the author of A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void and Kathleen’s Cariole Ride. http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

http://www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com