Archives for posts with tag: book from love letters
A tiny 2-inch pop-up Valentine, circa 1920

A tiny 2-inch pop-up Valentine, circa 1920 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Come with Kathleen as a Valentine’s treat

Because her story is so sweet.

Kathleen was a British high school girl in 1917 when her father brought a Canadian sailor home for tea. The suspenseful excitement of falling in love, marrying and then living amongst the Swampy Cree in Canada’s northern wilderness is captured in Kathleen’s Cariole Ride: A True Love Story from over the Ocean and in the Bush after WWI. Their daughter’s loving book takes you deeply inside the raw emotions of their own letters. The highlight of their (and their foetus’) adventures was a five-day sub-zero winter trek and a difficult birth.

Final Proof of a paperback edited with phone help from Createspace

Final Proof of a paperback edited with phone help from Createspace

Remember! A book makes a heartwarming, non-fattening, long-lasting gift for Valentine’s Day. It’s a joy for me to meet and chat with people in the friendly, creative atmosphere of the Russell Flea Market on Sat., Feb. 10th, while signing copies. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could join us?

Does this story remind you of an event in your family’s history? If so, we’d love to hear about it in the comment box.

Thank you for dropping by Cozy Book Basics. You may find other stories you like by clicking above on ‘Home’ and scrolling down to browse through the archives. My writing grew out of a paradoxical parsonage childhood being nurtured by incongruous parents. To find out more, follow this Amazon link to A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void,  Kathleen’s Cariole Ride and Eating at Church. Please join me on Goodreads or check out my personal author page also.

Happy Reading & Writing from Cozy Book Basics!

http://www.cozybookbasics.wordpress.com   margaret@kell.ca

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The magic of writing a memoir is like pulling a rabbit out of a hat, only in reverse. That’s my new theory. When my mother posed for this picture in 1928, just after marrying, coming to Canada and starting life on an Indian reserve, she had no idea I’d write a book from her love letters and adventures some day.

Imagine my joy at receiving these emails from two of the first avid readers of Kathleen’s Cariole Ride in its paperback edition. They’re from Catherine and Fred Dunlop, my second cousins who have a beautiful farm and family.

Here’s what Catherine says about the book, so eloquently:

“Margaret – I have just finished reading this wonderful book and I still have tears in my eyes, it is so well written. Mental images appear with the flow of your words and they transport me, it seems, right into that setting.
I am not a writer, but I am a voracious reader and I so enjoy how you can make a scene come to life with just descriptive passages. I laughed, I shook my head in disbelief many times and, as I said, cried when I had finished. I cannot say enough about this wonderful gift of love to your parents. I am going to order several today. I want to put one in our local library and I also want to give each of our children a copy. Uncle Jack baptized all three of our children.
I often called Uncle Jack ‘the oldest teenager I know’ and he seemed to enjoy that. We also had many discussions around theology topics. He was a man thinking unlike many of the ministers of his time. Aunt Kay was always so quiet and reserved but, once, she and I were talking out in my kitchen as I was cutting meat and she seemed vitally interested in my life, asking me questions about how I was coping with motherhood and a busy husband. Her way of saying “I know exactly what you are going through”?
Anyway, thank you for writing this story, THEIR story, so beautifully.

Catherine”

And here’s what Fred, who sent the photos, had to say:

“Good morning Margaret – we found this picture of your parents in a family trunk that mom had put away. The picture is in a frame made of rabbit skin. Mom has written on the back of the picture Rev Kell, Aunt Kathleen, Oxford House. Manitoba, 1925 (about)
love
Fred”

Some people just have all the luck when it comes to parents and cousins, so I have a grateful heart I wanted to share with you.

Thank you for dropping by. This blog for all lovers of life and language aims to be useful and entertain. To order a copy of Kathleen’s Cariole Ride, please click here.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

Memorial or Remembrance or Veterans’ Days come and go, but a love that rose out of the ashes of a World War shines on. It recently inspired an official reviewer for OnlineBookClub.org to give  it a 4 out of 4 rating and recommend it as “a rare treat for the modern generation”.

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Here is what it  says:

“How does it feel to see life through the eyes of our ancestors? Primitive? Romantic? Or down right sacred? For me, a culmination of all three.

This is indeed an unusual love story, a tribute to innocent and pure love. There has been no dramatization of this love story, no passion forced, yet the hard journey of two souls are depicted in their own words. The protagonists were from two different backgrounds. Kathleen Elizabeth was the daughter of a city councillor in Portsmouth, England while Jack was a farmer from Cookstown, Ontario, Canada. Though he was a farmer’s son he signed up to open a Methodist teaching and preaching mission at God’s Lake, Manitoba. His main aim was to evangelize the Aboriginals. Jack was no weakling and he had to go through many hardships in his daily lifte . . .

Jack knew he had to provide a good example to get their trust and love. He set up schools where he motivated the students and their parents to start learning. His school started with one kid and slowly it built up in strength to 21 kids. He started making a difference. . .

Kathleen on the other hand was studying at medical school after her sweetheart died in World War I. Then she had a nervous breakdown and started managing her family’s bakery café. Though she liked Jack, she felt she could not lead the hardships of that kind of life. She refused to marry him when he asked her for the first time, much to the dismay of her family. But that started a series of correspondence between them.

It is quite romantic the way Jack would wait for her letters. How much trouble he had to go through to get those letters! Maybe this story is not passionate in the telling sense but I found his actions in order to get the letters not only passionate but also emotional. It might be difficult to be a knight in shining armor but to love someone across the globe takes a lot of determination and loyalty. A rare combination in today’s world.

How they eventually meet and marry and Kathleen faces the hardships of the journey are written beautifully in their diary which is beautifully presented by Margaret Kell Virany.

This is a very difficult piece to present to the world. It carries a part of your heart and you cannot twist it in any way without taking the authenticity away from the raw emotions of Jack and Kathleen. It has been a pleasure to glimpse the world through their eyes. A rare treat for the modern generation indeed!”

Quoted from http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=13369

Thank you for visiting. This blog for all lovers of life and language aims to be useful and entertain. Topics vary from how to build a canoe to how my mom moved from “prince to preacher and fog to bog” as a war bride after world war one. Writing advice is squeezed in between. Find out more about A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void,  Kathleen’s Cariole Ride and Eating at Church on Amazon,  Goodreads or my website.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

I’ll be at La Foire des Artisans at  Galeries d’Aylmer on Sat., Nov. 25 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to chat and sign copies of my books. Michele Szabad will be there too to sign copies of her newly published sensation on the life of an army brat.