Archives for posts with tag: Fiza Pathan

fizafaceTwins clash and a teacher is ruined by his peers in Raman and Sunny: Middle School Blues, author Fiza Pathan‘s inspiring new full-length novel. It is a crown of jewels to entertain readers and sit atop her several award-winning books.

  • She tackles bullying, being a twin, parenting and suicide risk while disastrous tween-age errors in judgment and villainous teacher politics wreak havoc. Her fresh outlook as a child of the nineties (now a seasoned teacher and tutor of grade-six-plus students) brings sound content and intelligent resolution to the story.Raman and Sunny ebook (1)Raman Sharma, only a few minutes older than his brother Sunny, is fed up with leading the life of a twin and desperate to establish his own, separate identity. At the beginning of the book they don’t even walk to school together any more, although they are in the same class. Uncontrolled emotions of lying, anger, jealousy and revenge take over, leading to despicable acts of betrayal and violence. A new teacher with a revolutionary philosophy of education as a “holistic experience” made up of “Question, Research, Debate” arrives on the scene. Sunil Sir is exceedingly popular with the students and, also, a pretty good detective.
  • Pathan’s work attains classic standards with its interesting plot, satisfying structure, universal theme (of redemption), suspenseful climax and elegant style. It falls into the categories of ‘literary’ fiction for its social commentary and in-depth characterization, and ‘paraliterary’ fiction for its fast pace and focus on action. The “pizza” forgiveness scene made this reader cry.
  • The novel is set in Pathan’s native Mumbai, with a few chapters retreating for a bittersweet interlude at a school for orphans surrounded by beautiful roses, but occasionally disrupted by unwanted wild life.
  • This book is very worthwhile reading, particularly for children and their parents involved with middle schools. Unforgettable sentences such as, “A child with an inquiring mind will always achieve academic excellence” and “Now I realize the importance of having a brother in my life who cares for me” could even transform readers’ lives.
  • http://www.amazon.com/Raman-Sunny-Middle-School-Blues-ebook/dp/B019CPQUJS/

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics

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http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

“Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned,” from Act 3, Scene 2, The Mourning Bride (1697) by English playwright and poet William Congreve flamealwaysburn

Fiza Pathan, author of The Flame Always Burns

Fiza Pathan, author of The Flame Always Burns

Using vivid imagery, raw emotion and superb writing, Fiza Pathan’s forty-four poems selected in The Flame Will Always Burn take us inside the heart of a young woman who is totally, irrevocably traumatized by a first experience of love transformed into utter disaster. It is not a pleasant sight, not easy to stomach, but needed to be written not only as a soul’s cry for help but also as heroic self-help and a desire to help others. Some of the titles like “Love Comes with a Knife”, “Your Reeking Flesh” and “They Found Me in a Pool of Blood” have vicious content but here are some gentler samples: In the opening poem “My Two Hearts” Pathan writes, “When this poor heart of mine is set on fire By infidelity and sudden awakened heartbreak, Then what’s there in a drink or two To abate the end of my world? I will not forget this laceration in my chest, Forever shall I remember my eternal grief. Someone who has given me this wound in my soul Has also handed me a glass of strong wine. Wounds of the soul don’t get healed in a year or two As they remain like fungus around a loving red heart. Therefore how I wish I had two hearts, One for the bottle and the other for the balm.” On page 21, the title poem “The Flame Will Always Burn” says, “My charming lover, please return to this fire so scorching To call out your promises again and again and again. There is this distance and there is a sea that separates us, But these smouldering lips of mine still cry out In the twilight hour for you.” By page 37, in “I Sing My Guitar to Sleep”, she obsesses, “I try to sing the song I wrote for you, But the silence echoes as I, the mad one, cut Each of the instrument’s strings with a scissor. The tune resonates where there is no noise, The tune is quiet in the midst of my screams of terror. I strip out ribbons from my flesh and string it to my guitar. They sound so sweet like the melting snow running into gentle waters. The notes of music so divine press me on and on Until my senses are no more. Tired and weary without hope for your love, I sing my guitar to sleep entwined in the obsessional note.” The Flame Will Always Burn holds potions of rage, pain, addiction, self-loathing, murder, suicide, intoxication, infatuation and outrageousness but ends on page 90 with a plea. In the history of medicine and literature, the disease of love sickness has baffled doctors and poets. Pathan’s poems are a major contribution towards understanding it more thoroughly and comforting its millions of sufferers.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

http://www.margaretvirany.com

handsupclassics2

Your child’s self image and empowerment can grow because of one young woman’s sharing of her early and lifelong passion for reading good books. Here’s a video clip of the Classics Excellence award quiz at teacher/author Fiza Pathan’s launch of How We Can Encourage Children to Read the Classics. Test yourself to see if you know as much as the kids. It’s a long video, so start watching from 46:30 and then follow to the end.

http://insaneowl.com/2015/02/09/video-of-book-launch-classics-how-we-can-encourage-children-to-read-them-17th-january-2015/

Fiza Pathan’s 19-Point Quiz on Classic Books

  1. Who wrote Alice in Wonderland?
  2. Who wrote The Jungle Book?
  3.  Who wrote Oliver Twist?
  4. Who wrote The Time Machine?
  5. In what book does the main character say, “Please, sir, I want some more”
  6. Name one book by Jules Verne
  7. Name one book by Jack London
  8. What classic has a white whale as its main character?
  9. What classic is narrated by a horse?
  10.  What is the sequel to Alice in Wonderland?
  11. What is the sequel to The Three Musketeers?
  12. What revolution is highlighted in A Christmas Carol?
  13. What revolution is highlighted in A Tale of Two Cities?
  14. Name the man in 19th century England who couldn’t find work as a doctor and so he became the world’s most famous detective story writer
  15. Name the man in the 19th century who wrote books which were all failures except one.
  16. Name the funniest classic of the late 19th century
  17.  Name the 19th century classic also known as A Tale of the Christ.
  18. Name three books written by Jules Verne.
  19. Name three books written by H.G. Wells

Answers: (1) Lewis Carroll (2) Rudyard Kipling (3) Charles Dickens (4) H.G. Wells (5) Oliver Twist (6) Around the World in Eighty Days (7) The Call of the Wild (8) Moby Dick (9) Black Beauty (10) Through the Looking Glass (11) The Man in the Iron Mask (12) Industrial Revolution (13) French Revolution (14) Sherlock Holmes (15) Bram Stoker (16)Three Men in a Boat (17) Ben Hur (18) Journey to the Centre of the Earth, Around the World in Eighty Days, A Thousand Leagues under the Sea (19) The Time Machine, War of the Worlds, The First Man on the Moon (There could be other answers to (18) and (19) since these authors wrote a number of books.)

Thank you for dropping by. This blog for all lovers of life and language aims to be useful and entertaining. Topics vary from how to build a canoe to how my mom moved from “prince to preacher and fog to bog” as a war bride after world war one. Writing advice is squeezed in between. Find out more about A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void, Kathleen’s Cariole Rideand Eating at Church on Amazon, Goodreads or my website.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

pinocchiofizaGetting children to read classic books, even hilarious ones like Pinocchio, is not always easy but the stakes couldn’t be higher. They’re our best bet for ever achieving our dreams for self-realization, rebirth, peace, redemption and goodwill to all mankind. A good boy was what Geppetto was trying to carve out of his outrageously impossible, willful puppet. What classic books come to tell us is that the paradise-on-earth we dream of is never easy but can always happen. With more than ever readers, available books, gift-giving grandparents, creative teachers, informed parents and technological tools, we should be able to progress: – the Gutenberg Project offers free e-book versions of all books in print – you can download excerpts from movies of classics on devices; e.g. a mother I know used  Frozen (from a Hans Christen Andersen story) to organize a birthday party – a variety of audiovisual resources can be used in classrooms to stimulate interest pathanChampioning the cause is the beautiful, brave Fiza Pathan, a perceptive, passionate, young teacher and author who says she was “born to read”. She has just written How We Can Encourage Children to Read the Classics as a sequel to her bestseller, Why We Should Encourage Children to Read the Classics. An appendix and index tie her second book to her first for easy reference.She also portrays the poverty of her native Mumbia, India in a powerful novella about Nirmala the Mud Blossom, a tragic slum girl whose parents punish and beat her for reading After reading Pathan’s first book, I accepted her challenge of reading a classic a week. Luckily, I uploaded the original unabridged, illustrated version of my childhood favorite, Pinocchio. I was stunned to find out it’s about much more than your nose growing long if you lie. It is a nightmarish, heartrending, fantastical tale that veers in and out of life and death via sea monsters, evil deceivers, whippings, starvation, cold, burning, hanging and metamorphosis into a donkey’s body before the hero stops being other people’s puppet, realizes how much he loves his father (plus his conscience and good fairy) and how right they were. Chicago would have no gang and delinquency problems if all adults read this book to their children when young, and the child reread it in the unabridged version when older. Pathan’s two 100-page handbooks, based on her own experiences, should be bought by anyone who has anything to do with kids. The sequel contains tips, approaches, methods, book lists, quizzes, puzzles and insight to help you and yours get over the barriers that stand in the way of making reading the classics a habit you will love. Pathan spent hours in a school library in early childhood instead of with a babysitter. The librarian helped her select which books she wanted and they became her best friends. Today she is familiar with a huge number of books, continues to be an avid reader of contemporary as well as classic books and has acquired a sizable collection which she loans out to children. Some of the 10 pointers are for teachers and some for parents. Others apply in the classroom, library, group, one-to-one, home or other settings.

How to Use Pathan’s Handbooks to Encourage the Success of Children You Know

1. Find quotes to motivate yourself, remind yourself of the names and authors of time-honored books, refresh yourself on the difference between classics and other books and keep your mind clear about why this is important. 2. Have fun, educate and inform yourself by doing the puzzles and quizzes. 3. Be alert to small strategies, such as placing stacks of modern books and classics on different tables or corners of the room. 4. Develop the traits, patience, skills, persistence and loving approach you will need to successfully introduce a child to one, first classic you sense will suit them. 5. Use your imagination and resourcefulness to adapt and expand on Pathan’s advice with your own ideas. 6. Assess her observations that by reading classics a student gains descriptive powers, logical thinking, scientific skills, knowledge of history, philosophy, morals, better all-round performance, creative skills, compassion and empathy. 7. (Teachers) Try out her basic, direct classroom methods of showing a movie first, reading snippets in class, doing quizzes and having the students read a classic as a study-room or exam-writing break. Different children learn in different ways. 8. (Teachers) Also use her indirect classroom techniques such as PowerPoints, having the children make charts and do research, giving them roles to act out the books as plays. Teacher or parent can prepare and give a talk on the importance of reading the classics. 9.(Parents) She describes how she works with parents in her private tutoring classes and book club for children and wants to do more. Reading stories (abridged classics) out loud to young children is basic. Reading books conspicuously in front of older children sets an example and arouses curiosity. 10. Support school initiatives such as rapid reading, holiday reading, using excerpts from classics in comprehension classes, creating school libraries and classroom bookshelves. If your school has ‘value education’ or ‘moral science education’ classes, as in India, material from the classics could be part of the resources. Fiza Pathan has taken on a huge task. To help her campaign snowball or to buy her books, contact her at www.insaneowl.com, or www.amazon.com/author/fizapathan. If you have comments or ideas to share, I’d be delighted to get them and pass them on. Thank you for dropping by. This blog for all lovers of life and language aims to be useful and entertain. Topics vary from how to build a canoe to how my mom moved from “prince to preacher and fog to bog” as a war bride after world war one. We pass on writing advice by word and example. Find out more about A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void, Kathleen’s Cariole Ride and Eating at Church  by clicking here.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

fican encourage

The girl in this picture could have been Fiza Pathan, now a 25-year-old teacher and writer from Mumbai. Instead, today she is publishing  her novella Nirmala, The Mud Blossom on Kindle.

The cover of Fiza Pathan's new Kindle book

The cover of Fiza Pathan’s new Kindle book

Pathan just celebrated the first anniversary of Classics: Why We Should Encourage Our Children to Read Them.

Due largely to hard promotional work in the social media, it has been a great success during the year, selling hundreds of copies worldwide and engaging parents and children in choosing the classics that are just right for them. This can empower them individually and help save the world.

Nirmala, The Mud Blossom cries out on behalf of thousands of slum children who are abandoned to filth and poverty in the big cities of India. The scourges of prejudice against girls, communicable diseases, domestic brutality, hunger, infestations, street crimes and hatred scream for kindness, attention and reform.

Pathan’s own life story began with her mother being ordered by her father-in-law to remove herself and her baby girl from his house because she had not produced a male grandchild. Consolation for the little girl came from books in the school library where her mother left her while busy teaching. Today, when Pathan writes about books, she is talking about the living friends of her childhood, the dreams, the ambitions and the view of the world she formed when so young and sensitive.

From books, she discovered herself, particularly in the horror-filled, bloody Dracula. When Pathan shows a precocious mastery of many genres — fable, poetry, short story, novel, non fiction, essay — it is because she is at home with the best writers in all those genres. When she delves right into deep passions and bloody scenarios it is because that is where she is coming from. Her writing has a special quality; her works on Amazon are ‘must- reads.’

Like others before her (even the Angel Gabriel exhorted Muhammed to “Read!”), Pathan seeks to define the essence of reading and why the world must have it. She wants to engage other twenty-somethings and younger readers in saving the world through books and writing “a brave new story for mankind.”

I highly recommend Nirmala, The Mud Blossom as a compelling read. No one with a heart can come away from it without being changed. You will feel the pain and the love behind every word and image, Pathan identifies herself so strongly with her creations. You will have to give of yourself and no doubt end up being a more empathetic person, more likely to help save the world, for it.

As for my anniversary gift, it is a big bundle of love, congratulations and wishes for continued success in your writing, teaching and life, Fiza!

Thank you for dropping by. This blog for all lovers of life and language aims to be useful and entertain. Topics vary from how to build a canoe to how my mom moved from “prince to preacher and fog to bog” as a war bride after world war one. Writing advice is squeezed in between. Find out more about A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void, Kathleen’s Cariole Ride and Eating at Church on Amazon, Goodreads or my website.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!

 

6209113I’ve discovered a fantastic e-book and suggest you may want to buy a copy too (for $2.99) and write a review to encourage the author. Here’s why:

  • At age 23, Fiza Pathan of Mumbai, India feels “totally cool and self-actualized” due to reading the classics since childhood
  • reading a classic a week or a month is a habit she’s trying to spread to all parents, teachers and students
  •  her 90-page Amazon e-book, Classics: Why We Should Encourage Children to Read the Classics, states her case with passion, personality and  precision. The 90-pages divide into 17 mostly four-page chapters
  • she lists favorite girls’ and boys’ classics as voted on by her students
  • language skills and vocabulary, imagination, general knowledge, love for literature, descriptive powers and morals develop from reading them

The content is particularly rich with details of her own and her students’ development.  Artistic and scientific temperaments are dealt with engagingly in the chapters entitled My Encounter with Dracula, Frankenstein and Science, and Classical Characters Who Have Influenced My Reality.

Pathan’s insightful tips are gems for the reader to take away:

  • choosing the right first classic is very important in the education process
  • classics cause children get better grades, speak and write articulately,  and grow up to be happy people
  • classics are like bound movie scripts for our brain production house
  • classics are the safest and most time-tested method to ignite the flame of creativity
  • classics are defined as “books of all time rather than books of the hour” and “clean, decent fiction written primarily to tell a story rather than make money”
  • classics are tools of information that encourage the student to think practically
  • more than anything else, classics give a middle school student some direction in life
  • The world is not a humdrum affair of facts but an adventure without limitations
  • Children need a bit of good fiction to nourish them in a world that seems out to kill them
  • A good writer will manage to help the reader create a good ending for him or herself in real life

Teachers will want to adopt Pathan’s original techniques for enlivening English classes. Parents and grandparents will be empowered to see how they can have an effect. It’s easy to follow her prescription of reading a classic a week or month by downloading classics available free due to the Gutenberg project.

As well as feeling “totally cool and self-actualized”, Pathan also writes, “The growing globalized society of the late 1990‘s has developed to such greatness that though I am 23 I feel completely ancient”. In wisdom, yes, she is ancient. With our support, her book can be a work of rejuvenation, not just for literacy but for humanity also.

Margaret Kell Virany   lover of language and literature, note-taker of Northrop Frye, journalist, editor, author

www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany   margaret@kell.ca

http://www.margaretvirany.com  

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