Archives for posts with tag: H.G. Wells

Count Leo Tolstoy and H. G. Wells are delicious sources of marriage counseling. They knew all about long-lasting marital love, the theme of the book I am now writing,  so I have gone to them to broaden my knowledge and get some new wrinkles.

Writing Secret # 6 from the Reclusive Lady of Shalott: Reading is a large part of writing, not to be neglected. You owe it to your readers to be informed on your subject. You owe it to yourself to know who your competitors are.

  • Tolstoy’s book, Anna Karenina, portrays the successful marriage of Konstantin Leven and his wife Kitty. The detailed ups and downs of a husband’s emotions come from the fact that Konstantin, the awkward landowner, resembles Tolstoy himself.
  • H. G. Wells’ book, Marriage, is a marvelous adventure story, full of confidence about what pleases women, and optimism. It was made into a movie in Hollywood’s pioneer days.
  • When the marriage breaks down and Rag is going off on his own to the most remote place in the world he can think of–namely, Labrador–Madge is persuaded by her mother-in-law to drop everything (even, figuratively, her young child) and goes along, too.
  • Also helpful is the role model of my parents’ 61-year marriage, portrayed in Kathleen’s Cariole Ride.
  •  Kay and Jack forge their happiness in Canada’s isolated north, with the earthy input of native wisdom. So do Wells’ hero and heroine.
  • They had to cope with giving birth while living in the bush, and that’s where the cariole comes into the picture. Kay insisted on having her baby in a hospital.
  • That might make sense to a British war bride but it was not easy when the temperature was thirty below and the hospital was five days by dog team away.
  • However, Jack was undaunted and his guide was all-knowing. Needless to say it was accomplished; the author is proof.

But after the birth what happened? Here are some quotes to show it wasn’t going to be so simple to retrieve mother and baby and bring them back to the Indian reserve (as it was called in 1929.)

” On March 9  they parted, since it was too cold to take the baby on a  trip … They would meet again, when the spring waters flowed.” 

“In late May, Jack and two guides started out for Norway House with a canoe tied to a toboggan…” 

“They got on a private motorboat…and were lucky they didn’t drown…”                        

From pages 110-111 of Kathleen’s Cariole Ride.

 

Kathleen’s Cariole Ride will be on sale at Prose in the Park, Ottawa’s young, famous, wide-open literary event, on June 4. It is a happy, optimistic story where you can laugh out loud as you watch other people struggle. You hope that, like most of us, these characters, with all their idiosyncracies, will somehow get out of the muck.

 

http://www.amazon.com/author/margaretvirany

 

handsupclassics2

Your child’s self image and empowerment can grow because of one young woman’s sharing of her early and lifelong passion for reading good books. Here’s a video clip of the Classics Excellence award quiz at teacher/author Fiza Pathan’s launch of How We Can Encourage Children to Read the Classics. Test yourself to see if you know as much as the kids. It’s a long video, so start watching from 46:30 and then follow to the end.

http://insaneowl.com/2015/02/09/video-of-book-launch-classics-how-we-can-encourage-children-to-read-them-17th-january-2015/

Fiza Pathan’s 19-Point Quiz on Classic Books

  1. Who wrote Alice in Wonderland?
  2. Who wrote The Jungle Book?
  3.  Who wrote Oliver Twist?
  4. Who wrote The Time Machine?
  5. In what book does the main character say, “Please, sir, I want some more”
  6. Name one book by Jules Verne
  7. Name one book by Jack London
  8. What classic has a white whale as its main character?
  9. What classic is narrated by a horse?
  10.  What is the sequel to Alice in Wonderland?
  11. What is the sequel to The Three Musketeers?
  12. What revolution is highlighted in A Christmas Carol?
  13. What revolution is highlighted in A Tale of Two Cities?
  14. Name the man in 19th century England who couldn’t find work as a doctor and so he became the world’s most famous detective story writer
  15. Name the man in the 19th century who wrote books which were all failures except one.
  16. Name the funniest classic of the late 19th century
  17.  Name the 19th century classic also known as A Tale of the Christ.
  18. Name three books written by Jules Verne.
  19. Name three books written by H.G. Wells

Answers: (1) Lewis Carroll (2) Rudyard Kipling (3) Charles Dickens (4) H.G. Wells (5) Oliver Twist (6) Around the World in Eighty Days (7) The Call of the Wild (8) Moby Dick (9) Black Beauty (10) Through the Looking Glass (11) The Man in the Iron Mask (12) Industrial Revolution (13) French Revolution (14) Sherlock Holmes (15) Bram Stoker (16)Three Men in a Boat (17) Ben Hur (18) Journey to the Centre of the Earth, Around the World in Eighty Days, A Thousand Leagues under the Sea (19) The Time Machine, War of the Worlds, The First Man on the Moon (There could be other answers to (18) and (19) since these authors wrote a number of books.)

Thank you for dropping by. This blog for all lovers of life and language aims to be useful and entertaining. Topics vary from how to build a canoe to how my mom moved from “prince to preacher and fog to bog” as a war bride after world war one. Writing advice is squeezed in between. Find out more about A Book of Kells: Growing Up in an Ego Void, Kathleen’s Cariole Rideand Eating at Church on Amazon, Goodreads or my website.

Happy Reading from Cozy Book Basics!